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Institut for Kultur og Læring

Conference on 'Community and the Sea in the Age of Sail'

The interdisciplinary conference on 'Community and the Sea in the Age of Sail' will explore the part played by community in the history of ships, port cities, oceangoing and empire

Tidspunkt

24.05.2012 kl. 09.00 - 25.05.2012 kl. 18.30

Beskrivelse

A two-day international conference
24-25 May 2012 at the Utzon Center, Aalborg, Denmark

The interdisciplinary conference on 'Community and the Sea in the Age of Sail' will explore the part played by community in the history of ships, port cities, oceangoing and empire. What part did community play in the complex world of the seas and their ships, and what did it mean to be a 'part' – or not – of these communities as such?

The conference seeks to bring together different perspectives on the histories of the sea and the many different communities of people traversing the sea or otherwise dealing with the ocean. Thus, the event will explore forms of agency involving issues of race, class, gender, cultural identity and performance.

We wish to confront issues like: How did questions of community shape struggles for agency among both seafaring and port-resident groups, and to what extent were these struggles themselves about commonality? What was the political arithmetic of authority and resistance in the age of sail? How was it performed and what was its rhetoric?

Keynote speakers include Professor Marcus Rediker, University of Pittsburgh, USA and Professor Clare Anderson, University of Leicester, UK

The conference is held under the auspices of CEPS - Cultural Encounters of Premodern Societies and CGS - Institute of Cultural and Global Studies, Aalborg University, Denmark.

For more information on the event please email the organizers

 

Program

Thursday, May 24th, 2012

09.00 -09.10 Welcome
09.10 -10.10

Keynote lecture

MARCUS REDIKER, UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH, USA 
'The Reports of Illiterate Men': Sailors, Seaports, and Global History

10.30 -12.00

Community and vessels of war

NIKLAS FRYKMAN, CLAREMONT MCKENNA COLLEGE, CLAREMONT, USA
Floating Republics: Insurrectionary communities at sea during the French Revolutionary Wars

JAKOB SEERUP, DANISH NATIONAL ARMOURIES, COPENHAGEN, DENMARK
Community on Danish warships in the 18th century

LUKE MARTINEZ, UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH, USA 
“Sons of Neptune, Sons of Liberty”: Privateering and the American Revolution at Sea

12.00 -13.00 Lunch
13.00 -14.00

Common spaces, com m on worlds?

JOHAN HEINSEN, AALBORG UNIVERSITY, DENMARK
“Pretending Liberty”: Lively tongues and narratives of contentious community

ISAAC CURTIS, UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH, USA
“All in the Same Boat”: Pere Labat, Maritime History, and the Prospects of Transnational Caribbean History from Below in the Seventeenth Century

14.15-15.45

Community, sailors and colonial ports

NICOLE ULRICH, RHODES UNIVERSITY, EASTERN CAPE, SOUTH AFRICA
Seafarers, Community, and Proletarian / Popular Radicalism in Southern African Seas and Ports: the case of the Cape of Good Hope, 1790-1815

TITAS CHAKRABORTY, PITTSBURGH UNIVERSITY, USA
Desertion in the Dutch East India Company settlements in Bengal in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries

STEVEN PITT, UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH, USA
Against the Puritan Patriarch: Sailors and the Changing Nature of Community in Eighteenth Century Boston

16.15-17.45

Life, labour and the sea

RICHARD GORSKI, UNIVERSITY OF HULL, UK
Rhythms of Life and Labour at the end of the 'Age of Sail': Some Implications for Sailors Ashore

FRIGREN PIRITA, DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY AND ETHNOLOGY, UNIVERSITY OF JYVÄSKYLÄ, FINLAND
Wives or Widows? Desertions of Married Seamen - varying consequences on their wives' everyday life in the 19th Century Finnish Port Town Community 

BO POULSEN, UNIVERSITY OF AALBORG, DENMARK/JELLE VAN LOTTUM, UNIVERSITY OF BIRMINGHAM, UK
The agency of fishermen's skills in early modern Europe - a comparison of human capital indices in the fishing sector

 

Friday, May 25th, 2012

09.00 -10.00

Keynote Lecture

CLARE ANDERSON, UNIVERSITY OF LEICESTER, UK
Subaltern Histories of the Indian Ocean: forced migration in the age of sail

10.30 -12.00

Politics of the seas

DAVID CHAPPELL, UNIVERSITY OF HAWAII, USA
Oceania: A Web of Traditional and Post-Contact Sailing Communities

JENNIFER GAYNOR, UNIVERSITY OF BUFFALO, USA
Capture's effacement, the politics of inclusion, and lineages of community: Southeast Asian Sama
sea people in Bugis language manuscripts

AARON JAFFER, UNIVERSITY OF WARWICK, UK
Mutineers, Chiefs and Rajahs: The diplomatic dimension of Lascar mutiny, c. 1780-1860

12.00 -13.00 Lunch
13.00 -14-30

Between Sea and land

JOSEPH CHRISTENSEN, UNIVERSITY OF WESTERN AUSTRALIA, MURDOCH
Sea People of the Maritime Frontier: Continuity and Change in Liminal Communities on Australia's
North-West Coast

YEVAN TERRIEN, UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH, USA
'We All Live By Wrecking': Marine Salvage, Capitalism, and US Expansion in Key West, Florida
(1821-1860)

WILLIAM TAYLOR, UNIVERSITY OF WESTERN AUSTRALIA, CRAWLEY
A Sociology of Buoyancy: ship launches and 'sallying ship' near the end of the age of sail

15.00 -16.30

“Get a Life”: (Re)visiting seafaring archives

HAMISH MAXWELL-STEWART, UNIVERSITY OF TASMANIA, HOBARTH
Rites of Passage: Rethinking the Penal Labour Archive

ISAAC LAND, INDIANA STATE UNIVERSITY, USA
Performing Petition and Producing Bureaucracy in the Royal Hospital for Seamen at Greenwich

VALERIE BURTON, MEMORIAL UNIVERSITY, NEWFOUNDLAND, CANADA
Reaching from the Sailor's Archive: Democratizing Maritime History in the 21st Century

18.30 - Conference dinner

 

 

Professor Marcus Rediker, Distinguished Professor
Pittsburgh University, USA 

Biography

He was born in Owensboro, Kentucky, in 1951. He comes from a working-class family, with roots in the mines and factories of Kentucky, Tennessee, and Virginia; He grew up in Nashville and Richmond. He attended Vanderbilt University, dropped out of school and worked in a factory for three years, and graduated with a B.A. from Virginia Commonwealth University in 1976. He went to the University of Pennsylvania for graduate study, earning an M.A. and Ph.D. in history. He taught at Georgetown University from 1982 to 1994, lived in Moscow for a year (1984-5), and am currently Distinguished Professor of Atlantic History at the University of Pittsburgh. He has, over the years, been active in a variety of social justice and peace movements, most recently in the worldwide campaign to abolish the death penalty. He has written, co-written, or edited six books: Between the Devil and the Deep Blue Sea (1987); Who Built America? (1989), volume one; The Many-Headed Hydra (2000); Villains of All Nations (2004); The Slave Ship: A Human History (2007); and Many Middle Passages (2007). I am currently working on a new history of the Amistad Rebellion.

 

Professor Clare Anderson, Professor of History
Leicester University, UK

Biography

Clare Anderson is a professor of history, with interests in colonialism and colonial societies across the British Empire. She studied for an undergraduate degree in History-Sociology, and for a PhD in History, at the University of Edinburgh. She joined the Department of Economic and Social History at the University of Leicester in 1997, moving to the Department of Sociology at the University of Warwick in 2007. She returned to the School of Historical Studies in 2011. Her research centres on the Indian Ocean during the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, and she is especially interested in the history of confinement. She has worked on prisons, penal colonies, plantations, and migrant ships, and her interests also include forced labour, the history of anthropology, photography, and the body. She held an ESRC Research Fellowship between 2002 and 2006, and worked on nineteenth-century British penal settlements. Subsequently, she held the one-year Caird Senior Research Fellowship and then the two-year Sackler-Caird Research Fellowship at the National Maritime Museum. She then developed research on subaltern experiences and biographies of Indian Ocean journeying. She has held visiting professorships on the Culture and Commerce in the Indian Ocean project, University of Technology Sydney (2009, 2011), and is currently editor of the Journal of Colonialism and Colonial History.

Kontakt

Institut for Kultur og Globale Studier
Kroghstræde 1
9220 Aalborg Øst

Telefon: 9940 9208
Mail: contact@cgs.aau.dk

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EAN-nummer: 5798 000 420 793
P-nummer: 1012065945
CVR/VAT-nummer: DK 29102384
 

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